Industrial Utility Efficiency    

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The System Assessment

Food

Any modern food manufacturing facility employs compressed air extensively in the plant. As common

Plastics

PET Power Containers, a Canadian manufacturer of PET plastic containers, had plans for expanding

Paper

Rockline Industries is one of the largest global producers of consumer products, specializing in

Printing

The Trinity Mirror Group print works on Oldham is one of the UK’s largest newspaper printers

Pharmaceutical

The United States accounts for roughly half of the global pharmaceutical market. This certainly

Auto

Nissan North America operates on a massive scale. The company’s powertrain assembly plant in

Bulk

A trio of stationary compressors produce 630,000 m3/hr of air for the oxygen plant at Pueblo Viejo

Transit

In aerospace manufacturing, tiny details matter most. For instance, if proper torque is not applied

Metals

Quite a number of worst-case compressed air scenarios have been encountered over the years but none

Medical

In the U.S. as an example, the NFPA has taken the view that if your compressor draws in good clean

Power

Nuclear power plants produce electricity for people, business and industry.  Electricity is

Oil & Gas

Compressed Air Best Practices® Magazine spoke with Mark Shedd, Head of Oil-free Air, Aggreko

Wastewater

Aeration tanks use bubble diffusers to distribute oxygen within the wastewater. Fine bubble
Rotary screw air compressor that makes its own lubricant from the surrounding air delivers oil-free compressed air to an environmental laboratory in Stuttgart, Germany - Many sensitive sectors of industry require oil-free compressed air. However, meeting this demand is often not as simple as it sounds. One way is to use oil-injected air compressors with downstream air treatment to meet the demand. A second option is oil-free air compressors, which operate without lubricants. Both versions have their own advantages as well as risks. Another alternative is to use rotary screw air compressors that use water as a lubricant.
When some people think about compressed air, they imagine the big, loud, dirty, unreliable machine in the back corner of their facility. Many businesses around the world rely on compressed air, and an unreliable air compressor can mean stopping an entire facility, costing thousands of dollars in lost productivity and repair labor. Additionally, that loud machine in the back corner is also a major energy consumer. So much so that many industry professionals refer to it as the “fourth utility.”
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) honored, in April in Washington D.C., 149 businesses and organizations in 35 states for their commitment to saving energy and protecting the environment through superior energy efficiency achievements. Recipients of the 2016 Energy Star Partner of the Year Award included Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celanese Corporation and Owens Corning.

“This year’s Partner of the Year Award winners prove every day that saving money and protecting the environment go hand in hand,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.
As a result of compressed air awareness training and a focus on energy management, two facilities in different parts of the world have reduced their compressed air demand substantially by removing vortex style cabinet coolers from some of their electrical panels and reworking the cooling systems.  These facilities were previously unaware of the high cost of compressed air and how much could be saved if other methods of cooling were used. This article describes some of their efforts in demand reduction.